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ABET Course Objectives and Outcomes Form

Course number and title: EE102 Systems and Signals
Credits: 4
Instructor(s)-in-charge: D. Cabric (danijela@ee.ucla.edu)
Course type: Lecture
Required or Elective: Required.
Course Schedule:
Lecture: 4 hrs/week. Meets twice weekly.
Dicussion: 1 hr/discussion section. Multiple discussion sections offered per quarter.
Outside Study: 7 hrs/week.
Office Hours: 2 hrs/week by instructor. 2 hrs/week by each teaching assistant.
 
Course Assessment:
Homework: 8 assignments
Exams: 1 or 2 midterms and 1 final examination (varies with instructor).
Design: Matlab-based design project
 
Grading Policy: Typically 10-15% homework, 10-15% design, 30-35% midterm, 50% final (varies with instructor).
Course Prerequisites: Math 33A. Corequisite: Math 33B.
Catalog Description: Elements of differential equations, first- and second-order equations, variation of parameters method and method of undetermined coefficients, existence and uniqueness. Systems: input/output description, linearity, time-invariance, and causality. Impulse response functions, superposition and convolution integrals. Laplace transforms and system functions. Fourier series and transforms. Frequency response, responses of systems to periodic signals. Sampling theorem.  
Textbook and any related course material:
¤ N.Levan, Systems and Signals, 3rd Edition, Optimization Softwate Publications Division, Springer Verlag, 1983.
¤ Lecture notes posted online by F. Paganini, http://www.ee.ucla.edu/~paganini
 
Course Website
Additional Course Website
Topics covered in the course and level of coverage:
¤ Introduction to signals and systems, linearity, time-invariance and causality. 4 hrs.
¤ Analysis of systems in the time domain: The Dirac delta function, the system impulse response, convolution and applications. Cascaded systems. 8 hrs.
¤ Laplace transforms and their applications to differential equations and to linear time-invariant systems. 8 hrs.
¤ Fourier series of periodic continuous time functions. Properties and applications: mean square approximation, periodic response of a system. 10 hrs.
¤ Fourier transforms, properties, and applications. Frequency response functions. 8 hrs.
¤ The sampling theorem. 2 hrs.
Course objectives and their relation to the Program Educational Objectives:  
Contribution of the course to the Professional Component:
Engineering Topics: 0 %
General Education: 0 %
Mathematics & Basic Sciences: 0 %
Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:
Mathematics: Strong
Physics: Not Applicable
Chemistry: Not Applicable
Technical writing: Average
Computer Programming: Average
Material available to students and department at end of course:
  Available to
students
Available to
department
Available to
instructor
Available to
TA(s)
Course Objectives and Outcomes Form: X X X X
Lecture notes, homework assignments, and solutions: X X X X
Samples of homework solutions from 2 students: X
Samples of exam solutions from 2 students: X
Course performance form from student surveys: X X
Will this course involve computer assignments? YES Will this course have TA(s) when it is offered? YES

  Level of contribution of course to Program Outcomes
(a) Strong  
(b) Strong  
(c) Strong  
(g) Average  
(i) Average  
(m) Strong  
Strong: (a) (b) (c) (m)
Average: (g) (i)

:: Upon completion of this course, students will have had an opportunity to learn about the following ::
  Specific Course Outcomes Program Outcomes
1. Understand the concept of a signal and a system, plot continuous-time signals, evaluate the periodicity of a signal. a
2. Identify properties of continuous-time systems such as linearity, time-invariance, and causality. a m
3. Solve constant-coefficient differential equations. a m
4. Calculate with the Dirac delta function. a m
5. Compute convolution of continuous-time functions. a
6. Understand the concept of the impulse response function of a linear system, and its use to describe the input/output relationship. a
7. Compute the Laplace transform of a continuous function, identify its domain of convergence, and be familiar with its basic properties, including the initial and final value theorems. a m
8. Find the inverse Laplace transform by partial fractions. a m
9. Use the Laplace transform to solve constant-coefficient differential equations with initial conditions. a m
10. Use the Laplace transform to evaluate the transfer function of linear time-invariant systems. a m
11. Compute the Fourier series representation of a periodic function, in both exponential and sine-cosine forms. a m
12. Understand Parseval�s relation in Fourier series, and its interpretation in terms of decomposing the signal�s energy between its harmonics. a
13. Evaluate the response of a linear time-invariant system to periodic inputs. a
14. Evaluate the Fourier transform of a continuous function, and be familiar with its basic properties. Relate it to the Laplace transform. a m
15. Evaluate and plot the frequency responses (magnitude and phase) of linear time-invariant systems, and apply it to filtering of input signals. a
16. Understand conditions under which a band-limited function can be recovered from its samples. a
17. Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class. Opportunity to conduct a matlab-based design project requiring some independent reading, programming, simulations and technical writing. a b c g i
18. Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor and the teaching assistant(s) during regular office hours and discussion sections in order to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material. i

  Program outcomes and how they are covered by the specific course outcomes
(a) ¤  Understand the concept of a signal and a system, plot continuous-time signals, evaluate the periodicity of a signal.  
¤  Identify properties of continuous-time systems such as linearity, time-invariance, and causality.  
¤  Solve constant-coefficient differential equations.  
¤  Calculate with the Dirac delta function.  
¤  Compute convolution of continuous-time functions.  
¤  Understand the concept of the impulse response function of a linear system, and its use to describe the input/output relationship.  
¤  Compute the Laplace transform of a continuous function, identify its domain of convergence, and be familiar with its basic properties, including the initial and final value theorems.  
¤  Find the inverse Laplace transform by partial fractions.  
¤  Use the Laplace transform to solve constant-coefficient differential equations with initial conditions.  
¤  Use the Laplace transform to evaluate the transfer function of linear time-invariant systems.  
¤  Compute the Fourier series representation of a periodic function, in both exponential and sine-cosine forms.  
¤  Understand Parseval�s relation in Fourier series, and its interpretation in terms of decomposing the signal�s energy between its harmonics.  
¤  Evaluate the response of a linear time-invariant system to periodic inputs.  
¤  Evaluate the Fourier transform of a continuous function, and be familiar with its basic properties. Relate it to the Laplace transform.  
¤  Evaluate and plot the frequency responses (magnitude and phase) of linear time-invariant systems, and apply it to filtering of input signals.  
¤  Understand conditions under which a band-limited function can be recovered from its samples.  
¤  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class. Opportunity to conduct a matlab-based design project requiring some independent reading, programming, simulations and technical writing.  
(b) ¤  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class. Opportunity to conduct a matlab-based design project requiring some independent reading, programming, simulations and technical writing.  
(c) ¤  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class. Opportunity to conduct a matlab-based design project requiring some independent reading, programming, simulations and technical writing.  
(g) ¤  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class. Opportunity to conduct a matlab-based design project requiring some independent reading, programming, simulations and technical writing.  
(i) ¤  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class. Opportunity to conduct a matlab-based design project requiring some independent reading, programming, simulations and technical writing.  
¤  Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor and the teaching assistant(s) during regular office hours and discussion sections in order to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material.  
(m) ¤  Identify properties of continuous-time systems such as linearity, time-invariance, and causality.  
¤  Solve constant-coefficient differential equations.  
¤  Calculate with the Dirac delta function.  
¤  Compute the Laplace transform of a continuous function, identify its domain of convergence, and be familiar with its basic properties, including the initial and final value theorems.  
¤  Find the inverse Laplace transform by partial fractions.  
¤  Use the Laplace transform to solve constant-coefficient differential equations with initial conditions.  
¤  Use the Laplace transform to evaluate the transfer function of linear time-invariant systems.  
¤  Compute the Fourier series representation of a periodic function, in both exponential and sine-cosine forms.  
¤  Evaluate the Fourier transform of a continuous function, and be familiar with its basic properties. Relate it to the Laplace transform.  

:: Last modified: February 2013 by J. Lin ::

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