EEweb Home     ::     Graduate Courses     ::     Undergraduate Courses     ::     My Home

ABET Course Objectives and Outcomes Form

Course number and title: EE110L Circuit Measurements Laboratory
Credits: 2
Instructor(s)-in-charge: B. Razavi (razavi@ee.ucla.edu)
Course type: Laboratory
Required or Elective: Required.
Course Schedule:
Lecture: 1 hr/week. Meets once weekly.
Lab: 3 hrs/lab section.
Outside Study: 5 hrs/week.
Office Hours: 1 hr/week by instructor. 2 hrs/week by each teaching assistant.
 
Course Assessment:
Quizzes: 4 to 5 quizzes.
Labs: 7 reports and pre-labs.
 
Grading Policy: Typically 50% lab reports and prelabs, 30% quizzes, and 20% attendance and performance during the lab.
Course Prerequisites: EE100 or EE110.
Catalog Description: Experiments with basic circuits containing resistors, capacitors, inductors, and op-amps. Ohm's law voltage and current division, Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits, superposition, transient and steady state analysis, and frequency response principles.  
Textbook and any related course material:
¤ H. Babaie and E. Yablonovitch, EE110L Lab Manual, available in class.
¤ EE110 course textbook.
 
Course Website
Topics covered in the course and level of coverage:
¤ Safety and instrument orientation. 4 hrs.
¤ Resistors and Ohm�s law. 4 hrs.
¤ Kirchhoff�s current and voltage laws. 4 hrs.
¤ Nodal and loop equations, superposition, Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits. 4 hrs.
¤ AC circuits, RC, and RL circuits. 4 hrs.
¤ Series and parallel RLC circuits. 8 hrs.
¤ Signal generator output resistance, Twin T-notch filters. 4 hrs.
¤ Operational amplifier characteristics, inverting and noninverting amplifiers. 4 hrs.
Course objectives and their relation to the Program Educational Objectives:  
Contribution of the course to the Professional Component:
Engineering Topics: 0 %
General Education: 0 %
Mathematics & Basic Sciences: 0 %
Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:
Mathematics: Strong
Physics: Average
Chemistry: Not Applicable
Technical writing: Some
Computer Programming: Not Applicable
Material available to students and department at end of course:
  Available to
students
Available to
department
Available to
instructor
Available to
TA(s)
Course Objectives and Outcomes Form: X X X X
Lecture notes, homework assignments, and solutions: X X X X
Samples of lab reports from 2 students: X
Course performance form from student surveys: X X
Will this course involve computer assignments? NO Will this course have TA(s) when it is offered? YES

  Level of contribution of course to Program Outcomes
(a) Average  
(b) Strong  
(c) Strong  
(d) Strong  
(e) Strong  
(f) Some  
(g) Strong  
(h) Some  
(i) Average  
(k) Strong  
(m) Average  
Strong: (b) (c) (d) (e) (g) (k)
Average: (a) (i) (m)
Some: (f) (h)

:: Upon completion of this course, students will have had an opportunity to learn about the following ::
  Specific Course Outcomes Program Outcomes
1. Use of basic engineering instruments such as a DMM. a d f h k
2. Understand and compare basic electric circuit theorems with actual working circuits. a b d f h k
3. Understand Kirchhoff�s current and voltage laws and their equivalent circuits. a b
4. Understand how to use superposition to reduce circuits. a b c e m
5. Understand how to reduce a circuit and replace a portion of it with its Thevenin or Norton equivalent. a b c m
6. Learn about AC signals and their relation between the current and voltage in a capacitor and an inductor. a b c e
7. Understand the Bode plot (phase and amplitude) of a signal transfer ratio. a
8. Design and understand RLC circuits, both parallel and series. a b c e m
9. Design and test RLC resonance circuits. a b c e m
10. Design and understand simple low pass, high pass, and notch filters. a b c e m
11. Design an inverting and noninverting amplifier. a b c e m
12. Design an oscillator circuit using an operational amplifier. a b c e
13. Learn how to write a proper lab report (both content and presentation). a g
14. Several lab reports and prelabs discussing each lab concept in detail. a b c e g i
15. Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor and the teaching assistant(s) during regular office hours and discussion sections in order to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material. g i

  Program outcomes and how they are covered by the specific course outcomes
(a) ¤  Use of basic engineering instruments such as a DMM.  
¤  Understand and compare basic electric circuit theorems with actual working circuits.  
¤  Understand Kirchhoff�s current and voltage laws and their equivalent circuits.  
¤  Understand how to use superposition to reduce circuits.  
¤  Understand how to reduce a circuit and replace a portion of it with its Thevenin or Norton equivalent.  
¤  Learn about AC signals and their relation between the current and voltage in a capacitor and an inductor.  
¤  Understand the Bode plot (phase and amplitude) of a signal transfer ratio.  
¤  Design and understand RLC circuits, both parallel and series.  
¤  Design and test RLC resonance circuits.  
¤  Design and understand simple low pass, high pass, and notch filters.  
¤  Design an inverting and noninverting amplifier.  
¤  Design an oscillator circuit using an operational amplifier.  
¤  Learn how to write a proper lab report (both content and presentation).  
¤  Several lab reports and prelabs discussing each lab concept in detail.  
(b) ¤  Understand and compare basic electric circuit theorems with actual working circuits.  
¤  Understand Kirchhoff�s current and voltage laws and their equivalent circuits.  
¤  Understand how to use superposition to reduce circuits.  
¤  Understand how to reduce a circuit and replace a portion of it with its Thevenin or Norton equivalent.  
¤  Learn about AC signals and their relation between the current and voltage in a capacitor and an inductor.  
¤  Design and understand RLC circuits, both parallel and series.  
¤  Design and test RLC resonance circuits.  
¤  Design and understand simple low pass, high pass, and notch filters.  
¤  Design an inverting and noninverting amplifier.  
¤  Design an oscillator circuit using an operational amplifier.  
¤  Several lab reports and prelabs discussing each lab concept in detail.  
(c) ¤  Understand how to use superposition to reduce circuits.  
¤  Understand how to reduce a circuit and replace a portion of it with its Thevenin or Norton equivalent.  
¤  Learn about AC signals and their relation between the current and voltage in a capacitor and an inductor.  
¤  Design and understand RLC circuits, both parallel and series.  
¤  Design and test RLC resonance circuits.  
¤  Design and understand simple low pass, high pass, and notch filters.  
¤  Design an inverting and noninverting amplifier.  
¤  Design an oscillator circuit using an operational amplifier.  
¤  Several lab reports and prelabs discussing each lab concept in detail.  
(d) ¤  Use of basic engineering instruments such as a DMM.  
¤  Understand and compare basic electric circuit theorems with actual working circuits.  
(e) ¤  Understand how to use superposition to reduce circuits.  
¤  Learn about AC signals and their relation between the current and voltage in a capacitor and an inductor.  
¤  Design and understand RLC circuits, both parallel and series.  
¤  Design and test RLC resonance circuits.  
¤  Design and understand simple low pass, high pass, and notch filters.  
¤  Design an inverting and noninverting amplifier.  
¤  Design an oscillator circuit using an operational amplifier.  
¤  Several lab reports and prelabs discussing each lab concept in detail.  
(f) ¤  Use of basic engineering instruments such as a DMM.  
¤  Understand and compare basic electric circuit theorems with actual working circuits.  
(g) ¤  Learn how to write a proper lab report (both content and presentation).  
¤  Several lab reports and prelabs discussing each lab concept in detail.  
¤  Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor and the teaching assistant(s) during regular office hours and discussion sections in order to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material.  
(h) ¤  Use of basic engineering instruments such as a DMM.  
¤  Understand and compare basic electric circuit theorems with actual working circuits.  
(i) ¤  Several lab reports and prelabs discussing each lab concept in detail.  
¤  Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor and the teaching assistant(s) during regular office hours and discussion sections in order to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material.  
(k) ¤  Use of basic engineering instruments such as a DMM.  
¤  Understand and compare basic electric circuit theorems with actual working circuits.  
(m) ¤  Understand how to use superposition to reduce circuits.  
¤  Understand how to reduce a circuit and replace a portion of it with its Thevenin or Norton equivalent.  
¤  Design and understand RLC circuits, both parallel and series.  
¤  Design and test RLC resonance circuits.  
¤  Design and understand simple low pass, high pass, and notch filters.  
¤  Design an inverting and noninverting amplifier.  

:: Last modified: February 2013 by J. Lin ::

Copyright © 2003 UCLA Electrical and Computer Engineering Department. All rights reserved.
Please contact eeweb@ee.ucla.edu for comments or questions for the website.