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ABET Course Objectives and Outcomes Form

Course number and title: EE123B Fundamentals of Solid-State II
Credits: 4
Instructor(s)-in-charge: D. Huffaker (huffaker@ee.ucla.edu)
Course type: Lecture
Required or Elective: A pathway course.
Course Schedule:
Lecture: 3 hrs/week. Meets twice weekly.
Outside Study: 9 hrs/week.
Office Hours: 2 hrs/week by instructor.
 
Course Assessment:
Homework: 7 assignments.
Exams: 1 midterm and 1 final examination.
 
Grading Policy: Typically 30% homework, 30% midterm, 40% final.
Course Prerequisites: EE123A
Catalog Description: Discussion of solid-state properties, lattic vibrations, thermal properties, dielectric, magnetic, and superconducting properties.  
Textbook and any related course material:
¤ C. Kittel, Introduction to Solid State Physics, 7th Edition, Wiley, NY, 1996.
¤ Course notes available from E.R. Brown on course website.
 
Course Website
Topics covered in the course and level of coverage:
¤ Thermodynamics and statistical mechanics of solids. 3 hrs.
¤ Cohesive energy and elasticity. 4 hrs.
¤ Lattice waves and their quantization (phonons). 4 hrs.
¤ Lattice heat capacity and thermal conductivity. 4 hrs.
¤ Free electron Fermi gas and its thermal properties. 3 hrs.
¤ Electrostatics of solids; dielectrics and ferroelectrics. 4 hrs.
¤ Magnetostatics of solids; diamagnets and paramagnets. 4 hrs.
¤ Ferromagnetism. 2 hrs.
¤ Superconductivity 2 hrs.
Course objectives and their relation to the Program Educational Objectives:  
Contribution of the course to the Professional Component:
Engineering Topics: 0 %
General Education: 0 %
Mathematics & Basic Sciences: 0 %
Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:
Mathematics: Average
Physics: Strong
Chemistry: Some
Technical writing: Not Applicable
Computer Programming: Some
Material available to students and department at end of course:
  Available to
students
Available to
department
Available to
instructor
Available to
TA(s)
Course Objectives and Outcomes Form: X X X X
Lecture notes, homework assignments, and solutions: X X
Samples of homework solutions from 2 students: X
Samples of exam solutions from 2 students: X
Course performance form from student surveys: X X
Will this course involve computer assignments? YES Will this course have TA(s) when it is offered? NO

  Level of contribution of course to Program Outcomes
(a) Strong  
(c) Some  
(i) Average  
(l) Some  
(m) Average  
Strong: (a)
Average: (i) (m)
Some: (c) (l)

:: Upon completion of this course, students will have had an opportunity to learn about the following ::
  Specific Course Outcomes Program Outcomes
1. Recite the Boltzmann distribution function in terms of microscopic energy states. l
2. List the two key types of elastic waves in solids, and state which one generally has a higher velocity. a
3. Write down the relationship between stress along an axis, strain along that axis, and the Young�s modulus. a
4. State the classical theory (Dulong-Petit) expression for heat capacity in terms of the number of quanta and Boltzman�s constant. a
5. Know that lattice waves can be quantized, state what the resulting quanta are called and what their energy and momentum are in terms of Planck�s constant and the wave frequency. a
6. Understand how elastic waves are derived for solids having more than one atom per primitive cell, and that a new type of lattice wave emerges. State what this wave is called and how it relates to the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with solids. a
7. Write down the temperature dependence (power law) for the heat capacity of acoustic phonons in the limit of low temperatures. a m
8. State the dependence (according to kinetic theory) of thermal conductivity on heat capacity, particle velocity, and mean-free-path. a
9. Know that the Pauli exclusion principle prevents two electrons from occupying the same quantum state, define the characteristic maximum energy of free electrons in a metal and relate this to the mass and velocity of the electrons. a
10. State the result of Fermi theory for the contribution of the free electrons in a metal to the heat capacity of the solid (stated as a power law in temperature). a m
11. Write down the relationship between the electric energy density in a solid and the electric field (E). a m
12. Write down the relationship between the magnetic energy density in a solid and the magnetic field (H) a m
13. State what type of solid displays a permanent electric polarization, what type displays a permanent magnetization, and what happens at the Curie temperature in both of these types of solids. a
14. State what happens to an applied magnetic induction (B) inside a perfectly-diamagnetic, Type-I superconductor below the critical temperature. a m
15. Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class. a m
16. One computer-based homework assignment exposing students to �phonon engineering� of solids. c
17. Opportunities to interact twice weekly with the instructor during regular office hours to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material. i

  Program outcomes and how they are covered by the specific course outcomes
(a) ¤  List the two key types of elastic waves in solids, and state which one generally has a higher velocity.  
¤  Write down the relationship between stress along an axis, strain along that axis, and the Young�s modulus.  
¤  State the classical theory (Dulong-Petit) expression for heat capacity in terms of the number of quanta and Boltzman�s constant.  
¤  Know that lattice waves can be quantized, state what the resulting quanta are called and what their energy and momentum are in terms of Planck�s constant and the wave frequency.  
¤  Understand how elastic waves are derived for solids having more than one atom per primitive cell, and that a new type of lattice wave emerges. State what this wave is called and how it relates to the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with solids.  
¤  Write down the temperature dependence (power law) for the heat capacity of acoustic phonons in the limit of low temperatures.  
¤  State the dependence (according to kinetic theory) of thermal conductivity on heat capacity, particle velocity, and mean-free-path.  
¤  Know that the Pauli exclusion principle prevents two electrons from occupying the same quantum state, define the characteristic maximum energy of free electrons in a metal and relate this to the mass and velocity of the electrons.  
¤  State the result of Fermi theory for the contribution of the free electrons in a metal to the heat capacity of the solid (stated as a power law in temperature).  
¤  Write down the relationship between the electric energy density in a solid and the electric field (E).  
¤  Write down the relationship between the magnetic energy density in a solid and the magnetic field (H)  
¤  State what type of solid displays a permanent electric polarization, what type displays a permanent magnetization, and what happens at the Curie temperature in both of these types of solids.  
¤  State what happens to an applied magnetic induction (B) inside a perfectly-diamagnetic, Type-I superconductor below the critical temperature.  
¤  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class.  
(c) ¤  One computer-based homework assignment exposing students to �phonon engineering� of solids.  
(i) ¤  Opportunities to interact twice weekly with the instructor during regular office hours to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material.  
(l) ¤  Recite the Boltzmann distribution function in terms of microscopic energy states.  
(m) ¤  Write down the temperature dependence (power law) for the heat capacity of acoustic phonons in the limit of low temperatures.  
¤  State the result of Fermi theory for the contribution of the free electrons in a metal to the heat capacity of the solid (stated as a power law in temperature).  
¤  Write down the relationship between the electric energy density in a solid and the electric field (E).  
¤  Write down the relationship between the magnetic energy density in a solid and the magnetic field (H)  
¤  State what happens to an applied magnetic induction (B) inside a perfectly-diamagnetic, Type-I superconductor below the critical temperature.  
¤  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class.  

:: Last modified: February 2013 by J. Lin ::

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