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ABET Course Objectives and Outcomes Form

Course number and title: EE132B Data Communications and Telecommunication Networks
Credits: 4
Instructor(s)-in-charge: Not offered 2011-12
Course type: Lecture
Required or Elective: A pathway course.
Course Schedule:
Lecture: 4 hrs/week. Meets twice weekly.
Dicussion: 1 hr/discussion section. Multiple discussion sections offered per quarter.
Outside Study: 7 hrs/week.
Office Hours: 2 hrs/week by instructor. 2 hrs/week by teaching assistant.
 
Course Assessment:
Homework: 8 assignments including 1 computer workout.
Exams: 1 midterm and 1 final examination.
 
Grading Policy: Typically 25% homework, 25% midterm, 50% final.
Course Prerequisites: EE131A.
Catalog Description: Layered communications architectures. Queuing system modeling and analysis. Error control, flow and congestion control. Packet switching, circuit switching, and routing. Network performance analysis and design. Multiple-access communications: TDMA, FDMA, polling, random access. Local, metropolitan, wide area, integrated services networks.  
Textbook and any related course material:
¤ I. Rubin , Lecture Notes on Data Communications and Telecommunications Networks, available at the UCLA bookstore.
¤ A. Leon-Garcia and I. Widjaja, Communications Networks, McGraw Hill, NY, 2000.
 
Course Website
Topics covered in the course and level of coverage:
¤ Review of basic probability concepts. 2 hrs.
¤ Introduction to networks, OSI 7 layer model. 4 hrs.
¤ RS 232 Standard. 2 hrs.
¤ Circuit and Packet Switching. 4 hrs.
¤ Medium Access Control. 6 hrs.
¤ Error Control Techniques (ARQ). 4 hrs.
¤ Routing and Dijkstra�s Algorithm; flow/congestion control. 4 hrs.
¤ Discrete and Continuous Time Markov Chains; network traffic process simulations. 6 hrs.
¤ Queuing Systems; design of communications network modules. 6 hrs.
¤ Mathematical modeling of computer networks. 2 hrs.
Course objectives and their relation to the Program Educational Objectives:  
Contribution of the course to the Professional Component:
Engineering Topics: 0 %
General Education: 0 %
Mathematics & Basic Sciences: 0 %
Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:
Mathematics: Strong
Physics: Not Applicable
Chemistry: Not Applicable
Technical writing: Some
Computer Programming: Average
Material available to students and department at end of course:
  Available to
students
Available to
department
Available to
instructor
Available to
TA(s)
Course Objectives and Outcomes Form: X X X X
Lecture notes, homework assignments, and solutions: X
Samples of homework solutions from 2 students: X
Samples of exam solutions from 2 students: X
Course performance form from student surveys: X X
Will this course involve computer assignments? NO Will this course have TA(s) when it is offered? YES

  Level of contribution of course to Program Outcomes
(a) Strong  
(b) Average  
(c) Average  
(e) Average  
(i) Some  
(j) Strong  
(k) Some  
(l) Strong  
Strong: (a) (j) (l)
Average: (b) (c) (e)
Some: (i) (k)

:: Upon completion of this course, students will have had an opportunity to learn about the following ::
  Specific Course Outcomes Program Outcomes
1. Understand the difference between circuit and packet switching. a
2. Be able to analyze different MAC mechanisms (Aloha, Slotted Aloha, TDMA, FDMA) and understand their pros and cons. a b e l
3. Learn the differences between random access and scheduled MAC mechanisms. a c
4. Understand the difference between link state and distance vector routing. a b
5. Learn to carry out Dijkstra�s shortest path algorithm in a given network. a c
6. Understand how error control is implemented in telecommunication networks. a b
7. Mathematically model various error control schemes. a c
8. Understand the basics of the TCP/IP layer model, as well as the OSI 7 layer model. a j
9. Get an introduction on discrete and continuous stochastic processes. a e l
10. Understand why Geometric and Exponential Distributions are often used in Communication Systems modeling. a e l
11. Be able to apply Little�s formula to analyze the waiting time and system time of a queuing systems. a c e l
12. Be able to analyze and design any queuing system with exponential arrivals and service rates. a b e l
13. Be able to simulate exponential and geometric processes as well as their respective counting processes. (Computer Workout) to model traffic processes loading communications network systems under design. b k l
14. Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class; design approaches and methods included throughout. a c e l
15. One computer assignment exposing students to typical simulations carried out to analyze and model a queuing system. b c k l
16. Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor and the teaching assistant(s) during regular office hours and discussion sections in order to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material. i

  Program outcomes and how they are covered by the specific course outcomes
(a) ¤  Understand the difference between circuit and packet switching.  
¤  Be able to analyze different MAC mechanisms (Aloha, Slotted Aloha, TDMA, FDMA) and understand their pros and cons.  
¤  Learn the differences between random access and scheduled MAC mechanisms.  
¤  Understand the difference between link state and distance vector routing.  
¤  Learn to carry out Dijkstra�s shortest path algorithm in a given network.  
¤  Understand how error control is implemented in telecommunication networks.  
¤  Mathematically model various error control schemes.  
¤  Understand the basics of the TCP/IP layer model, as well as the OSI 7 layer model.  
¤  Get an introduction on discrete and continuous stochastic processes.  
¤  Understand why Geometric and Exponential Distributions are often used in Communication Systems modeling.  
¤  Be able to apply Little�s formula to analyze the waiting time and system time of a queuing systems.  
¤  Be able to analyze and design any queuing system with exponential arrivals and service rates.  
¤  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class; design approaches and methods included throughout.  
(b) ¤  Be able to analyze different MAC mechanisms (Aloha, Slotted Aloha, TDMA, FDMA) and understand their pros and cons.  
¤  Understand the difference between link state and distance vector routing.  
¤  Understand how error control is implemented in telecommunication networks.  
¤  Be able to analyze and design any queuing system with exponential arrivals and service rates.  
¤  Be able to simulate exponential and geometric processes as well as their respective counting processes. (Computer Workout) to model traffic processes loading communications network systems under design.  
¤  One computer assignment exposing students to typical simulations carried out to analyze and model a queuing system.  
(c) ¤  Learn the differences between random access and scheduled MAC mechanisms.  
¤  Learn to carry out Dijkstra�s shortest path algorithm in a given network.  
¤  Mathematically model various error control schemes.  
¤  Be able to apply Little�s formula to analyze the waiting time and system time of a queuing systems.  
¤  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class; design approaches and methods included throughout.  
¤  One computer assignment exposing students to typical simulations carried out to analyze and model a queuing system.  
(e) ¤  Be able to analyze different MAC mechanisms (Aloha, Slotted Aloha, TDMA, FDMA) and understand their pros and cons.  
¤  Get an introduction on discrete and continuous stochastic processes.  
¤  Understand why Geometric and Exponential Distributions are often used in Communication Systems modeling.  
¤  Be able to apply Little�s formula to analyze the waiting time and system time of a queuing systems.  
¤  Be able to analyze and design any queuing system with exponential arrivals and service rates.  
¤  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class; design approaches and methods included throughout.  
(i) ¤  Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor and the teaching assistant(s) during regular office hours and discussion sections in order to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material.  
(j) ¤  Understand the basics of the TCP/IP layer model, as well as the OSI 7 layer model.  
(k) ¤  Be able to simulate exponential and geometric processes as well as their respective counting processes. (Computer Workout) to model traffic processes loading communications network systems under design.  
¤  One computer assignment exposing students to typical simulations carried out to analyze and model a queuing system.  
(l) ¤  Be able to analyze different MAC mechanisms (Aloha, Slotted Aloha, TDMA, FDMA) and understand their pros and cons.  
¤  Get an introduction on discrete and continuous stochastic processes.  
¤  Understand why Geometric and Exponential Distributions are often used in Communication Systems modeling.  
¤  Be able to apply Little�s formula to analyze the waiting time and system time of a queuing systems.  
¤  Be able to analyze and design any queuing system with exponential arrivals and service rates.  
¤  Be able to simulate exponential and geometric processes as well as their respective counting processes. (Computer Workout) to model traffic processes loading communications network systems under design.  
¤  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class; design approaches and methods included throughout.  
¤  One computer assignment exposing students to typical simulations carried out to analyze and model a queuing system.  

:: Last modified: February 2013 by J. Lin ::

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