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ABET Course Objectives and Outcomes Form

Course number and title: EE141 Principles of Feedback Control
Credits: 4
Instructor(s)-in-charge: P. Tabuada (tabuada@ee.ucla.edu)
Course type: Lecture
Required or Elective: Required for students following the EE and BE options.
Course Schedule:
Lecture: 3 hrs and 40 min/week (1 hr and 50 min per lecture). Meets twice weekly.
Dicussion: hr/discussion section. Multiple discussion sections offered per quarter.
Outside Study: 7 hrs/week.
Office Hours: 2 hrs/week by instructor. 2 hrs/week by each teaching assistant.
 
Course Assessment:
Homework: 8 assignments.
Exams: 1 midterm and 1 final examination.
Design: Matlab-based design project.
 
Grading Policy: Typically 20% design, 20% homework, 25% midterm, 35% final.
Course Prerequisites: EE102.
Catalog Description: Mathematical modeling of physical control systems in form of differential equations and transfer functions. Design problems, system performance indices of feedback control systems via classical techniques, root-locus and frequency-domain methods. Computer-aided solution of design problems from real world.  
Textbook and any related course material:
G. F. Franklin, J. D. Powell and A. Emami-Naeini, Feedback Control of Dynamic Systems, 6th Edition, Pearson Higher Education, NJ, 2010.
 
Course Website
Topics covered in the course and level of coverage:
Introduction to feedback control and mathematical modeling of physical systems 4 hrs.
Review of Laplace transform, poles, zeros, and dynamic response 4 hrs.
Block diagram modeling, time-domain specifications, and stability of control systems 4 hrs.
Open-loop vs closed-loop control. Introduction to regulation and tracking 4 hrs.
PID control 4 hrs.
Control design based on root-locus. 8 hrs.
Control design based on frequency-response 8 hrs.
Linearization of nonlinear models 2 hrs.
Introduction to digital control 2 hrs.
Course objectives and their relation to the Program Educational Objectives:  
Contribution of the course to the Professional Component:
Engineering Topics: 0 %
General Education: 0 %
Mathematics & Basic Sciences: 0 %
Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:
Mathematics: Strong
Physics: Average
Chemistry: Not Applicable
Technical writing: Average
Computer Programming: Average
Material available to students and department at end of course:
  Available to
students
Available to
department
Available to
instructor
Available to
TA(s)
Course Objectives and Outcomes Form: X X X X
Lecture notes, homework assignments, and solutions: X X X X
Samples of homework solutions from 2 students: X
Samples of exam solutions from 2 students: X
Course performance form from student surveys: X X
Will this course involve computer assignments? YES Will this course have TA(s) when it is offered? YES

  Level of contribution of course to Program Outcomes
(a) Strong  
(b) Strong  
(c) Strong  
(g) Average  
(i) Average  
(m) Some  
(n) Some  
Strong: (a) (b) (c)
Average: (g) (i)
Some: (m) (n)

:: Upon completion of this course, students will have had an opportunity to learn about the following ::
  Specific Course Outcomes Program Outcomes
1. Identify the basic elements and structures of feedback control systems. a
2. Correlate the pole-zero configuration of transfer functions and their time-domain response to known test inputs. a m
3. Apply Routh-Hurwitz criterion to determine the domain of stability of linear time-invariant systems in the parameter space. a
4. Apply Final-value Theorem to determine the steady-state response of stable control systems. a n
5. Construct and recognize the properties of root-locus for feedback control systems with a single variable parameter. a
6. Specify design region in the s-plane in terms of settling-time, rise-time and overshoot to step-response. a c
7. Use root-locus method for the design of feedback control systems. a c n
8. Synthesize feedback control systems in terms of specified closed-loop pole-zero configuration. a c n
9. Construct Bode and polar plots for rational transfer functions. a m n
10. Specify control system performance in the frequency-domain in terms of gain and phase margins, and design compensators to achieve the desired performance. a c
11. Design sampled data systems using discrete equivalents; Understand the effects of sample rate selection. a c m
12. Several homework assignments delving on basic concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class. a i
13. At least two computer assignments exposing students to computer-aided design of practical feedback control systems. Opportunity to conduct matlab-based projects requiring some independent reading, programming, simulations and technical writing. b c g i
14. Design sampled data systems using discrete equivalents; Understand the effects of sample rate selection. i

  Program outcomes and how they are covered by the specific course outcomes
(a)   Identify the basic elements and structures of feedback control systems.  
  Correlate the pole-zero configuration of transfer functions and their time-domain response to known test inputs.  
  Apply Routh-Hurwitz criterion to determine the domain of stability of linear time-invariant systems in the parameter space.  
  Apply Final-value Theorem to determine the steady-state response of stable control systems.  
  Construct and recognize the properties of root-locus for feedback control systems with a single variable parameter.  
  Specify design region in the s-plane in terms of settling-time, rise-time and overshoot to step-response.  
  Use root-locus method for the design of feedback control systems.  
  Synthesize feedback control systems in terms of specified closed-loop pole-zero configuration.  
  Construct Bode and polar plots for rational transfer functions.  
  Specify control system performance in the frequency-domain in terms of gain and phase margins, and design compensators to achieve the desired performance.  
  Design sampled data systems using discrete equivalents; Understand the effects of sample rate selection.  
  Several homework assignments delving on basic concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class.  
(b)   At least two computer assignments exposing students to computer-aided design of practical feedback control systems. Opportunity to conduct matlab-based projects requiring some independent reading, programming, simulations and technical writing.  
(c)   Specify design region in the s-plane in terms of settling-time, rise-time and overshoot to step-response.  
  Use root-locus method for the design of feedback control systems.  
  Synthesize feedback control systems in terms of specified closed-loop pole-zero configuration.  
  Specify control system performance in the frequency-domain in terms of gain and phase margins, and design compensators to achieve the desired performance.  
  Design sampled data systems using discrete equivalents; Understand the effects of sample rate selection.  
  At least two computer assignments exposing students to computer-aided design of practical feedback control systems. Opportunity to conduct matlab-based projects requiring some independent reading, programming, simulations and technical writing.  
(g)   At least two computer assignments exposing students to computer-aided design of practical feedback control systems. Opportunity to conduct matlab-based projects requiring some independent reading, programming, simulations and technical writing.  
(i)   Several homework assignments delving on basic concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class.  
  At least two computer assignments exposing students to computer-aided design of practical feedback control systems. Opportunity to conduct matlab-based projects requiring some independent reading, programming, simulations and technical writing.  
  Design sampled data systems using discrete equivalents; Understand the effects of sample rate selection.  
(m)   Correlate the pole-zero configuration of transfer functions and their time-domain response to known test inputs.  
  Construct Bode and polar plots for rational transfer functions.  
  Design sampled data systems using discrete equivalents; Understand the effects of sample rate selection.  
(n)   Apply Final-value Theorem to determine the steady-state response of stable control systems.  
  Use root-locus method for the design of feedback control systems.  
  Synthesize feedback control systems in terms of specified closed-loop pole-zero configuration.  
  Construct Bode and polar plots for rational transfer functions.  

:: Last modified: February 2014 by Paulo Tabuada ::

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