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ABET Course Objectives and Outcomes Form

Course number and title: EE162A Wireless Communication Links and Antennas
Credits: 4
Instructor(s)-in-charge: Y. Rahmat-Samii (ramat@ee.ucla.edu)
Course type: Lecture
Required or Elective: A pathway course.
Course Schedule:
Lecture: 3 hrs/week. Meets twice weekly.
Dicussion: 1 hr/discussion section. Multiple discussion sections offered per quarter.
Outside Study: 8 hrs/week.
Office Hours: 2 hrs/week by instructor.
 
Course Assessment:
Homework: 7 assignments.
Exams: 1 midterm and 1 final examination.
 
Grading Policy: Typically 25% homework, 30% midterm, 45% final.
Course Prerequisites: EE161.
Catalog Description: Basic properties of transmitting and receiving antennas and antenna arrays. Array synthesis. Adaptive arrays. Friis transmission formula, radar equations. Cell-site and mobile antennas, bandwidth budget. Noise in communication systems (transmission lines, antennas, atmospheric, etc). Cell-site and mobile antennas, cell coverage for signal and traffic, interference, multipath fading, ray bending, and other propagation phenomena.  
Textbook and any related course material:
W. L. Stutzman and G. A. Thiele, Antenna Theory and Design, 2nd edition, Wiley, NY, 1998.
Y. Rahmat-Samii and Y. Wang, Lecture Notes.
 
Course Website
Topics covered in the course and level of coverage:
Maxwell Equations and boundary conditions. 3 hrs.
Wave equations and vector potentials. 1.5 hrs.
Radiation pattern and other antenna parameters. 3 hrs.
Dipole and small loop antennas. 3 hrs.
Friss transmission formula, Link budget and wireless propagation issues. 3 hrs.
Linear array, array feed and planar array. 4.5 hrs.
Computational EM (MoM for line antennas). 1.5 hrs.
Yagi-Uda and large loop antennas. 4.5 hrs.
Fundamental theorems. 3 hrs.
Microstrip antennas & Broadband antennas. 3 hrs.
Course objectives and their relation to the Program Educational Objectives:  
Contribution of the course to the Professional Component:
Engineering Topics: 0 %
General Education: 0 %
Mathematics & Basic Sciences: 0 %
Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:
Mathematics: Strong
Physics: Strong
Chemistry: Not Applicable
Technical writing: Not Applicable
Computer Programming: Average
Material available to students and department at end of course:
  Available to
students
Available to
department
Available to
instructor
Available to
TA(s)
Course Objectives and Outcomes Form: X X X X
Lecture notes, homework assignments, and solutions: X X X X
Samples of homework solutions from 2 students: X
Samples of exam solutions from 2 students: X
Course performance form from student surveys: X X
Will this course involve computer assignments? NO Will this course have TA(s) when it is offered? YES

  Level of contribution of course to Program Outcomes
(a) Strong  
(c) Some  
(d) Some  
(e) Average  
(i) Average  
(k) Average  
(m) Average  
(n) Some  
Strong: (a)
Average: (e) (i) (k) (m)
Some: (c) (d) (n)

:: Upon completion of this course, students will have had an opportunity to learn about the following ::
  Specific Course Outcomes Program Outcomes
1. Recite Maxwell�s equations, boundary conditions and their physical meaning. a m n
2. Derive the wave equation and vector potentials. a n
3. Generate the far field and plot the radiation pattern of any line antenna from the known current distribution. a d m
4. Evaluate the antenna parameters like gain, input impedance, polarization for dipole antennas. a k
5. Evaluate the property of small loop antennas. a k
6. Carry out wireless communication link budget using Friss transmission formula. a c d k
7. Derive and draw the antenna array factor for linear array and calculate the array gain. a k
8. Draw polar plot of array factor for linear phased array from universal pattern. a k
9. Design normal end-fire array and Hansen-woodyard array. a c
10. Select the appropriate array spacing to avoid grating lobes. a e k
11. Understand how a method of moment code is written and use it to calculate the characteristics of a half-wave dipole antenna. a k m
12. Understand how Yagi-Uda antenna works. a e
13. Know the current distribution and polarization states of a large loop antenna. a e
14. Understand imaging principle and equivalence principles and applications to Microstrip antennas. a e
15. Calculate the radiating frequency of a microstrip antenna from its dimension and feeding structure. a k
16. Understand the differences between two working modes of Helical antennas. k
17. Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class. a i
18. Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor and with teaching assistant(s) during office hours and discussion sections in order to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material. i

  Program outcomes and how they are covered by the specific course outcomes
(a)   Recite Maxwell�s equations, boundary conditions and their physical meaning.  
  Derive the wave equation and vector potentials.  
  Generate the far field and plot the radiation pattern of any line antenna from the known current distribution.  
  Evaluate the antenna parameters like gain, input impedance, polarization for dipole antennas.  
  Evaluate the property of small loop antennas.  
  Carry out wireless communication link budget using Friss transmission formula.  
  Derive and draw the antenna array factor for linear array and calculate the array gain.  
  Draw polar plot of array factor for linear phased array from universal pattern.  
  Design normal end-fire array and Hansen-woodyard array.  
  Select the appropriate array spacing to avoid grating lobes.  
  Understand how a method of moment code is written and use it to calculate the characteristics of a half-wave dipole antenna.  
  Understand how Yagi-Uda antenna works.  
  Know the current distribution and polarization states of a large loop antenna.  
  Understand imaging principle and equivalence principles and applications to Microstrip antennas.  
  Calculate the radiating frequency of a microstrip antenna from its dimension and feeding structure.  
  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class.  
(c)   Carry out wireless communication link budget using Friss transmission formula.  
  Design normal end-fire array and Hansen-woodyard array.  
(d)   Generate the far field and plot the radiation pattern of any line antenna from the known current distribution.  
  Carry out wireless communication link budget using Friss transmission formula.  
(e)   Select the appropriate array spacing to avoid grating lobes.  
  Understand how Yagi-Uda antenna works.  
  Know the current distribution and polarization states of a large loop antenna.  
  Understand imaging principle and equivalence principles and applications to Microstrip antennas.  
(i)   Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class.  
  Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor and with teaching assistant(s) during office hours and discussion sections in order to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material.  
(k)   Evaluate the antenna parameters like gain, input impedance, polarization for dipole antennas.  
  Evaluate the property of small loop antennas.  
  Carry out wireless communication link budget using Friss transmission formula.  
  Derive and draw the antenna array factor for linear array and calculate the array gain.  
  Draw polar plot of array factor for linear phased array from universal pattern.  
  Select the appropriate array spacing to avoid grating lobes.  
  Understand how a method of moment code is written and use it to calculate the characteristics of a half-wave dipole antenna.  
  Calculate the radiating frequency of a microstrip antenna from its dimension and feeding structure.  
  Understand the differences between two working modes of Helical antennas.  
(m)   Recite Maxwell�s equations, boundary conditions and their physical meaning.  
  Generate the far field and plot the radiation pattern of any line antenna from the known current distribution.  
  Understand how a method of moment code is written and use it to calculate the characteristics of a half-wave dipole antenna.  
(n)   Recite Maxwell�s equations, boundary conditions and their physical meaning.  
  Derive the wave equation and vector potentials.  

:: Last modified: February 2013 by J. Lin ::

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