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ABET Course Objectives and Outcomes Form

Course number and title: EE172 Introduction to Lasers and Quantum Electronics
Credits: 4
Instructor(s)-in-charge: B. Jalali (jalali@ee.ucla.edu)
Course type: Lecture
Required or Elective: A pathway course.
Course Schedule:
Lecture: 3 hrs/week. Meets twice weekly.
Dicussion: 1hr/discussion section. Multiple discussion sections offered per quarter.
Outside Study: 8 hrs/week.
Office Hours: 2 hrs/week by instructor. 2 hrs/week by each teaching assistant.
 
Course Assessment:
Homework: 8 assignments and quizzes.
Exams: 1 midterm and 1 final examination.
 
Grading Policy: Typically 30% quizzes, 30% midterm, 40% final.
Course Prerequisites: EE101.
Catalog Description: Physical applications and principles of lasers, Gaussian optics, resonant cavities, atomic radiation, laser oscillation and amplification, cw and pulsed lasers.  
Textbook and any related course material:
¤ J. Verdeyen, Laser Electronics, 3rd edition, Prentice Hall, NJ, 1994.
 
Course Website
Topics covered in the course and level of coverage:
¤ Introduction to lasers and their applications. 2 hrs.
¤ Gaussian beams and higher order modes. 4 hrs.
¤ Resonant optical cavities. 3 hrs.
¤ Atomic radiation, Einstein relations, three and four level lasers. 3 hrs.
¤ Rate equations, homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening. 3 hrs.
¤ Laser oscillation, amplification, ASE, gain narrowing. 3 hrs.
¤ Homogeneous and inhomogeneous saturation, hole burning. 3 hrs.
¤ Q-switching. 3 hrs.
¤ Mode-locking-active and passive. 3 hrs.
¤ Different types of lasers. 2 hrs.
Course objectives and their relation to the Program Educational Objectives:  
Contribution of the course to the Professional Component:
Engineering Topics: 0 %
General Education: 0 %
Mathematics & Basic Sciences: 0 %
Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:
Mathematics: Strong
Physics: Strong
Chemistry: Not Applicable
Technical writing: Not Applicable
Computer Programming: Some
Material available to students and department at end of course:
  Available to
students
Available to
department
Available to
instructor
Available to
TA(s)
Course Objectives and Outcomes Form: X X X X
Lecture notes, homework assignments, and solutions: X X X X
Samples of homework solutions from 2 students: X
Samples of exam solutions from 2 students: X
Course performance form from student surveys: X X
Will this course involve computer assignments? NO Will this course have TA(s) when it is offered? YES

  Level of contribution of course to Program Outcomes
(a) Strong  
(b) Some  
(e) Average  
(h) Some  
(i) Average  
(m) Average  
(n) Strong  
Strong: (a) (n)
Average: (e) (i) (m)
Some: (b) (h)

:: Upon completion of this course, students will have had an opportunity to learn about the following ::
  Specific Course Outcomes Program Outcomes
1. Understand the difference between plane waves and finite optical beams.Understand why finite beams diffract.Understand properties of Gaussian beams and higher order Hermite-Gaussian modes. a e
2. Understand resonant modes of an optical cavity,the ABCD law for Gaussian beams as applied to free space and optical cavities.Appreciate the stability criterion based on the ray matrix approach. a e
3. Understand collisional and radiative processes that determine the level populations in atoms. a e n
4. Appreciate the Boltzman relation, blackbody radiation, Einstein�s relationships and line shape functions. a m n
5. Know the laser oscillation condition.Rate equations for a two level atom. a m n
6. Work out the small signal gain coefficient and the pumping required ,the threshold gain coefficient. a m n
7. Understand why the gain saturates differently in homogeneously and inhomogeneously broadened media. a m n
8. Understand the concepts of hole burning , three and four level systems. a
9. Understand the difference between C.W.,Q-switched,and mode-locked lasers. a b e
10. Appreciate why and how lasers are Q-switched. a b
11. Appreciate why and how lasers are actively and passively mode locked. a b
12. Appreciate different kinds of lasers and what they are used for. b h
13. Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing the analytical skills learned in class. a i
14. Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor and the teaching assistant(s) during office hours and discussion sections in order to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material. i

  Program outcomes and how they are covered by the specific course outcomes
(a) ¤  Understand the difference between plane waves and finite optical beams.Understand why finite beams diffract.Understand properties of Gaussian beams and higher order Hermite-Gaussian modes.  
¤  Understand resonant modes of an optical cavity,the ABCD law for Gaussian beams as applied to free space and optical cavities.Appreciate the stability criterion based on the ray matrix approach.  
¤  Understand collisional and radiative processes that determine the level populations in atoms.  
¤  Appreciate the Boltzman relation, blackbody radiation, Einstein�s relationships and line shape functions.  
¤  Know the laser oscillation condition.Rate equations for a two level atom.  
¤  Work out the small signal gain coefficient and the pumping required ,the threshold gain coefficient.  
¤  Understand why the gain saturates differently in homogeneously and inhomogeneously broadened media.  
¤  Understand the concepts of hole burning , three and four level systems.  
¤  Understand the difference between C.W.,Q-switched,and mode-locked lasers.  
¤  Appreciate why and how lasers are Q-switched.  
¤  Appreciate why and how lasers are actively and passively mode locked.  
¤  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing the analytical skills learned in class.  
(b) ¤  Understand the difference between C.W.,Q-switched,and mode-locked lasers.  
¤  Appreciate why and how lasers are Q-switched.  
¤  Appreciate why and how lasers are actively and passively mode locked.  
¤  Appreciate different kinds of lasers and what they are used for.  
(e) ¤  Understand the difference between plane waves and finite optical beams.Understand why finite beams diffract.Understand properties of Gaussian beams and higher order Hermite-Gaussian modes.  
¤  Understand resonant modes of an optical cavity,the ABCD law for Gaussian beams as applied to free space and optical cavities.Appreciate the stability criterion based on the ray matrix approach.  
¤  Understand collisional and radiative processes that determine the level populations in atoms.  
¤  Understand the difference between C.W.,Q-switched,and mode-locked lasers.  
(h) ¤  Appreciate different kinds of lasers and what they are used for.  
(i) ¤  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing the analytical skills learned in class.  
¤  Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor and the teaching assistant(s) during office hours and discussion sections in order to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material.  
(m) ¤  Appreciate the Boltzman relation, blackbody radiation, Einstein�s relationships and line shape functions.  
¤  Know the laser oscillation condition.Rate equations for a two level atom.  
¤  Work out the small signal gain coefficient and the pumping required ,the threshold gain coefficient.  
¤  Understand why the gain saturates differently in homogeneously and inhomogeneously broadened media.  
(n) ¤  Understand collisional and radiative processes that determine the level populations in atoms.  
¤  Appreciate the Boltzman relation, blackbody radiation, Einstein�s relationships and line shape functions.  
¤  Know the laser oscillation condition.Rate equations for a two level atom.  
¤  Work out the small signal gain coefficient and the pumping required ,the threshold gain coefficient.  
¤  Understand why the gain saturates differently in homogeneously and inhomogeneously broadened media.  

:: Last modified: February 2013 by J. Lin ::

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