EEweb Home     ::     Graduate Courses     ::     Undergraduate Courses     ::     My Home

ABET Course Objectives and Outcomes Form

Course number and title: EEM116C Computer Systems Architecture
Credits: 4
Instructor(s)-in-charge: Not offered 2011-12
Course type: Lecture
Required or Elective: Required for students following the CE option.
Course Schedule:
Lecture: 4 hrs/week. Meets twice weekly.
Dicussion: 2 hrs/discussion section. Multiple discussion sections offered per quarter.
Outside Study: 12 hrs/week.
Office Hours: 2 hrs/week by instructor. 2 hrs/week by each teaching assistant.
 
Course Assessment:
Homework: 7 assignments.
Exams: 1 midterm and 1 final examination.
 
Grading Policy: Typically, 10% homework, 45% midterm, 45% final.
Course Prerequisites: EEM16 or CS M51A, CS 33. Recommended EEM116L or CS M152A, CS 111.
Catalog Description: Computer system organization and design, implementation of CPU datapath and control, instruction set design, memory hierarchy (caches, main memory, virtual memory) organization and management, input/output subsystems (bus structures, interrupts, DMA), performance evaluation, pipelined processors.  
Textbook and any related course material:
Hennessy and Patterson: Computer Organization and Design: The Hardware/Software Interface.
 
Course Website
Topics covered in the course and level of coverage:
Performance evaluation. 2 hrs.
Instruction sets. 6 hrs.
Arithmetic. 6 hrs.
Datapath and control. 8 hrs.
Pipelining. 8 hrs.
Memories. 8 hrs.
Peripherals. 2 hrs.
Course objectives and their relation to the Program Educational Objectives:  
Contribution of the course to the Professional Component:
Engineering Topics: 0 %
General Education: 0 %
Mathematics & Basic Sciences: 0 %
Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:
Mathematics: Some
Physics: Not Applicable
Chemistry: Not Applicable
Technical writing: Some
Computer Programming: Average
Material available to students and department at end of course:
  Available to
students
Available to
department
Available to
instructor
Available to
TA(s)
Course Objectives and Outcomes Form: X X X X
Lecture notes, homework assignments, and solutions: X
Samples of homework solutions from 2 students: X
Samples of exam solutions from 2 students: X
Course performance form from student surveys: X X
Will this course involve computer assignments? NO Will this course have TA(s) when it is offered? YES

  Level of contribution of course to Program Outcomes
(a) Strong  
(c) Average  
(g) Average  
(i) Average  
(m) Strong  
Strong: (a) (m)
Average: (c) (g) (i)

:: Upon completion of this course, students will have had an opportunity to learn about the following ::
  Specific Course Outcomes Program Outcomes
1. Compare the performance of computer systems using MIPS and MFLOPS ratings. a c i
2. Identify the components of an instruction set, such as opcode, operands, and format. a
3. Translate fractional numbers into IEEE scientific format. a m
4. Translate numbers in IEEE scientific format into their fractional form. a m
5. Implement 32-bit multiplication using iterative methods. a m
6. Construct a simple 32-bit datapath composed of two function units and a register file. a
7. Use pipelining to improve the performance of a simple 32-bit instruction set. a
8. Compare the design of direct-mapped and associative caches. a
9. Explain the function of the translation lookaside buffer in a memory management unit. a g
10. Explain the sequence of operations in handling interrupts from a variety of simple peripherals. a g
11. Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class. a i
12. Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor and the teaching assistant(s) during regular office hours and discussion sections in order to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material. i

  Program outcomes and how they are covered by the specific course outcomes
(a)   Compare the performance of computer systems using MIPS and MFLOPS ratings.  
  Identify the components of an instruction set, such as opcode, operands, and format.  
  Translate fractional numbers into IEEE scientific format.  
  Translate numbers in IEEE scientific format into their fractional form.  
  Implement 32-bit multiplication using iterative methods.  
  Construct a simple 32-bit datapath composed of two function units and a register file.  
  Use pipelining to improve the performance of a simple 32-bit instruction set.  
  Compare the design of direct-mapped and associative caches.  
  Explain the function of the translation lookaside buffer in a memory management unit.  
  Explain the sequence of operations in handling interrupts from a variety of simple peripherals.  
  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class.  
(c)   Compare the performance of computer systems using MIPS and MFLOPS ratings.  
(g)   Explain the function of the translation lookaside buffer in a memory management unit.  
  Explain the sequence of operations in handling interrupts from a variety of simple peripherals.  
(i)   Compare the performance of computer systems using MIPS and MFLOPS ratings.  
  Several homework assignments delving on core concepts and reinforcing analytical skills learned in class.  
  Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor and the teaching assistant(s) during regular office hours and discussion sections in order to further the students' learning experience and the students' interest in the material.  
(m)   Translate fractional numbers into IEEE scientific format.  
  Translate numbers in IEEE scientific format into their fractional form.  
  Implement 32-bit multiplication using iterative methods.  

:: Last modified: February 2013 by J. Lin ::

Copyright © 2003 UCLA Electrical Engineering Department. All rights reserved.
Please contact eeweb@ee.ucla.edu for comments or questions for the website.