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ABET Course Objectives and Outcomes Form

Course number and title: EEM171L Data Communication Systems Laboratory
Credits: 4
Instructor(s)-in-charge: R. Dzhanidze (revazd@cs.ucla.edu)
Course type: Laboratory
Required or Elective: A pathway laboratory course.
Course Schedule:
Dicussion: 2 hrs/week. Meets twice weekly.
Lab: 6 hrs/week.
Outside Study: 4 hrs/week.
Office Hours: 2 hrs/week by instructor.
 
Course Assessment:
Homework: 8 pre-laboratory assignments.
Labs: 8 reports.
Project Reports: 1 final comprehensive project.
 
Grading Policy: Typically, 20% homework, 20% lab experiments, 60% final comprehensive project.
Course Prerequisites: Recommended preparation: EEM116L.
Catalog Description: Interpretation of analog-signaling aspects of digital systems and data communications through experience in using contemporary test instruments to generate and display signals in relevant laboratory setups. USe of oscilloscopes, pulse and function generators, baseband spectrum analyzers, desktop computers, terminals, modems, PCs, and workstations in experiments on pulse transmission impairments, waveforms and their spectra, modem and terminal characteristics, and interfaces.  
Textbook and any related course material:
Handouts and lecture notes.
A. Tanenbaum, Computer Networks, Prentice Hall, NJ, 2003.
 
Course Website
Topics covered in the course and level of coverage:
Experiments on signals. Fourier transform. 6 hrs.
Experiments related to the processes provided by physical layer (Electrical signal propagation and analysis, Modulation, Demodulation, and Regeneration). 18 hrs.
Experiments on coax and twisted cable channels. 6 hrs.
Experiments on optical channels and DWDM systems. 12 hrs.
Experiments on wireless communication systems. 6 hrs.
Course objectives and their relation to the Program Educational Objectives:  
Contribution of the course to the Professional Component:
Engineering Topics: 0 %
General Education: 0 %
Mathematics & Basic Sciences: 0 %
Expected level of proficiency from students entering the course:
Mathematics: Average
Physics: Average
Chemistry: Not Applicable
Technical writing: Some
Computer Programming: Some
Material available to students and department at end of course:
  Available to
students
Available to
department
Available to
instructor
Available to
TA(s)
Course Objectives and Outcomes Form: X X X X
Lecture notes, homework assignments, and solutions: X X X X
Samples of homework solutions from 2 students: X X X
Samples of lab reports from 2 students: X X X
Course performance form from student surveys: X X
Will this course involve computer assignments? YES Will this course have TA(s) when it is offered? YES

  Level of contribution of course to Program Outcomes
(a) Strong  
(b) Strong  
(c) Strong  
(d) Average  
(e) Average  
(f) Strong  
(g) Average  
(h) Strong  
(j) Average  
(k) Average  
(m) Strong  
(n) Average  
Strong: (a) (b) (c) (f) (h) (m)
Average: (d) (e) (g) (j) (k) (n)

:: Upon completion of this course, students will have had an opportunity to learn about the following ::
  Specific Course Outcomes Program Outcomes
1. Understand structures of Computer Communication systems. d e f h
2. Understand Medium Access Control Protocols for reliable and noisy channels. b c
3. Use spectrum analyzers to analyze complex signals. k
4. Understand radio signal propagation and properties of wireless communication systems. b c
5. Understand Wireless LAN design and operation. c j m
6. Understand signal Fourier transforms. a b m
7. Understand the properties of transmission lines: Attenuation, Bandwidth, Reflection, Distortion, and Phase delay. a c k n
8. Understand the properties of LED and Laser diodes, the properties of p-i-n and Avalanche photo detectors. b c j k
9. Understand signal modulation, demodulation, multiplexing and de-multiplexing processes including light signal Multiplexers and Demultiplexers. b c k m
10. Use advanced digital oscilloscopes to measure signal characteristics. k
11. Design a laboratory experiment that demonstrates the properties of communication system components. b c k
12. Several homework assignments introducing the underlying science used in each experiment. a b k
13. Laboratory reports requiring the analysis of laboratory data vs. theoretical calculations. a b c g j k m
14. Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor during the laboratory. Because the groups of students are small (typically 2 or 3), there is a weekly opportunity for the instructor to directly interact with the students using a conversational form. g
15. Final comprehensive project requiring the student to re-design and re-think one of the 8 experiments he/she performed, including an in-depth analysis of the history of the science demonstrated in the experiment. a b c g j k m

  Program outcomes and how they are covered by the specific course outcomes
(a)   Understand signal Fourier transforms.  
  Understand the properties of transmission lines: Attenuation, Bandwidth, Reflection, Distortion, and Phase delay.  
  Several homework assignments introducing the underlying science used in each experiment.  
  Laboratory reports requiring the analysis of laboratory data vs. theoretical calculations.  
  Final comprehensive project requiring the student to re-design and re-think one of the 8 experiments he/she performed, including an in-depth analysis of the history of the science demonstrated in the experiment.  
(b)   Understand Medium Access Control Protocols for reliable and noisy channels.  
  Understand radio signal propagation and properties of wireless communication systems.  
  Understand signal Fourier transforms.  
  Understand the properties of LED and Laser diodes, the properties of p-i-n and Avalanche photo detectors.  
  Understand signal modulation, demodulation, multiplexing and de-multiplexing processes including light signal Multiplexers and Demultiplexers.  
  Design a laboratory experiment that demonstrates the properties of communication system components.  
  Several homework assignments introducing the underlying science used in each experiment.  
  Laboratory reports requiring the analysis of laboratory data vs. theoretical calculations.  
  Final comprehensive project requiring the student to re-design and re-think one of the 8 experiments he/she performed, including an in-depth analysis of the history of the science demonstrated in the experiment.  
(c)   Understand Medium Access Control Protocols for reliable and noisy channels.  
  Understand radio signal propagation and properties of wireless communication systems.  
  Understand Wireless LAN design and operation.  
  Understand the properties of transmission lines: Attenuation, Bandwidth, Reflection, Distortion, and Phase delay.  
  Understand the properties of LED and Laser diodes, the properties of p-i-n and Avalanche photo detectors.  
  Understand signal modulation, demodulation, multiplexing and de-multiplexing processes including light signal Multiplexers and Demultiplexers.  
  Design a laboratory experiment that demonstrates the properties of communication system components.  
  Laboratory reports requiring the analysis of laboratory data vs. theoretical calculations.  
  Final comprehensive project requiring the student to re-design and re-think one of the 8 experiments he/she performed, including an in-depth analysis of the history of the science demonstrated in the experiment.  
(d)   Understand structures of Computer Communication systems.  
(e)   Understand structures of Computer Communication systems.  
(f)   Understand structures of Computer Communication systems.  
(g)   Laboratory reports requiring the analysis of laboratory data vs. theoretical calculations.  
  Opportunities to interact weekly with the instructor during the laboratory. Because the groups of students are small (typically 2 or 3), there is a weekly opportunity for the instructor to directly interact with the students using a conversational form.  
  Final comprehensive project requiring the student to re-design and re-think one of the 8 experiments he/she performed, including an in-depth analysis of the history of the science demonstrated in the experiment.  
(h)   Understand structures of Computer Communication systems.  
(j)   Understand Wireless LAN design and operation.  
  Understand the properties of LED and Laser diodes, the properties of p-i-n and Avalanche photo detectors.  
  Laboratory reports requiring the analysis of laboratory data vs. theoretical calculations.  
  Final comprehensive project requiring the student to re-design and re-think one of the 8 experiments he/she performed, including an in-depth analysis of the history of the science demonstrated in the experiment.  
(k)   Use spectrum analyzers to analyze complex signals.  
  Understand the properties of transmission lines: Attenuation, Bandwidth, Reflection, Distortion, and Phase delay.  
  Understand the properties of LED and Laser diodes, the properties of p-i-n and Avalanche photo detectors.  
  Understand signal modulation, demodulation, multiplexing and de-multiplexing processes including light signal Multiplexers and Demultiplexers.  
  Use advanced digital oscilloscopes to measure signal characteristics.  
  Design a laboratory experiment that demonstrates the properties of communication system components.  
  Several homework assignments introducing the underlying science used in each experiment.  
  Laboratory reports requiring the analysis of laboratory data vs. theoretical calculations.  
  Final comprehensive project requiring the student to re-design and re-think one of the 8 experiments he/she performed, including an in-depth analysis of the history of the science demonstrated in the experiment.  
(m)   Understand Wireless LAN design and operation.  
  Understand signal Fourier transforms.  
  Understand signal modulation, demodulation, multiplexing and de-multiplexing processes including light signal Multiplexers and Demultiplexers.  
  Laboratory reports requiring the analysis of laboratory data vs. theoretical calculations.  
  Final comprehensive project requiring the student to re-design and re-think one of the 8 experiments he/she performed, including an in-depth analysis of the history of the science demonstrated in the experiment.  
(n)   Understand the properties of transmission lines: Attenuation, Bandwidth, Reflection, Distortion, and Phase delay.  

:: Last modified: February 2013 by J. Lin ::

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